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Orthodontics

Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that corrects teeth and jaws that are positioned improperly. Crooked teeth and teeth that do not fit together correctly are harder to keep clean, are at risk of being lost early due to tooth decay and periodontal disease, and cause extra stress on the chewing muscles that can lead to headaches, TMJ syndrome and neck, shoulder and back pain. Teeth that are crooked or not in the right place can also detract from one’s appearance.

Initial consultation, photographs were taken
Initial consultation, photographs were taken

The benefits of orthodontic treatment include a healthier mouth, a more pleasing appearance, and teeth that are more likely to last a lifetime.

As the case progress within 4-7 months
As the case progress within 4-7 months

How do I Know if I Need Orthodontics?

Only your dentist or orthodontist can determine whether you can benefit from orthodontics. Based on diagnostic tools that include a full medical and dental health history, a clinical exam, plaster models of your teeth, and special X-rays and photographs, an orthodontist or dentist can decide whether orthodontics are recommended, and develop a treatment plan that’s right for you.

If you have any of the following, you may be a candidate for orthodontic treatment:

Various malocclusions
Various malocclusions

Overbite, sometimes called “buck teeth” — where the upper front teeth lie too far forward (stick out) over the lower teeth

Underbite — a “bulldog” appearance where the lower teeth are too far forward or the upper teeth too far back
Crossbite — when the upper teeth do not come down slightly in front of the lower teeth when biting together normally
Open bite — space between the biting surfaces of the front and/or side teeth when the back teeth bite together
Misplaced midline— when the center of your upper front teeth does not line up with the center of your lower front teeth
Spacing — gaps, or spaces, between the teeth as a result of missing teeth or teeth that do not “fill up” the mouth
Crowding — when there are too many teeth for the dental ridge to accommodate

How Does Orthodontic Treatment Work?

Many different types of appliances, both fixed and removable, are used to help move teeth, retrain muscles and affect the growth of the jaws. These appliances work by placing gentle pressure on the teeth and jaws. The severity of your problem will determine which orthodontic approach is likely to be the most effective.

Fixed appliances include:

Braces — the most common fixed appliances, braces consist of bands, wires and/or brackets. Bands are fixed around the teeth or tooth and used as anchors for the appliance, while brackets are most often bonded to the front of the tooth. Arch wires are passed through the brackets and attached to the bands. Tightening the arch wire puts tension on the teeth, gradually moving them to their proper position. Braces are usually adjusted monthly to bring about the desired results, which may be achieved within a few months to a few years. Today’s braces are smaller, lighter and show far less metal than in the past. They come in bright colors for kids as well as clear styles preferred by many adults.

Within 7 months drastic changes in teeth and jaw position.
Within 7 months drastic changes in teeth and jaw position.

Removable appliances include:

Aligners — an alternative to traditional braces for adults, serial aligners are being used by an increasing number of orthodontists to move teeth in the same way that fixed appliances work, only without metal wires and brackets. Aligners are virtually invisible and are removed for eating, brushing and flossing.

Bone Screw orthodontics

Bone-screws or temporary anchorage devices (TAD), are very small screw-like gadgets used more widely in orthodontic treatments. They are becoming popular because they provide good anchorage, which means that they are fixed to bone and then linked to a tooth or a segment of teeth to slowly move them during treatment. It can be used in cases which patients refused jaw surgery or extra-oral appliance. In our clinic, we use them routinely like in the case illustrated above.

I personally like bone screws rather than orthonagtic surgeries and extra oral anchorage.
I personally like bone screws rather than orthonagtic surgeries and extra oral anchorage.